Indie Publisher of the Month for August 2020 – Atlantic Books @AtlanticBooks @CorvusBooks @AllenAndUnwinUK

Atlantic Books was founded in London in 2000, and has an impressive list of titles encompassing fiction, history, politics, memoirs and current affairs.

In both 2005 and 2009 it won ‘Imprint and Editor of the Year’ at the British Books Awards, and was ‘Independent Publisher of the Year’ in 2009. In 2008 it published the Man Booker Prize-winner The White Tiger by Aravind Adiga (one I can personally recommend) and it continues to publish titles that attracts the attention from a variety of awarding bodies including Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction, the Baillie Gifford Prize for Non-Fiction, the Royal Society Science Books Prize, the Wellcome Book Prize, the CWA Daggers Award, the RSL Ondaatje Prize, the Arthur C. Clarke Award and the Dylan Thomas Prize. Last year, 2019 Atlantic was again shortlisted for ‘Independent Publisher of the Year’ at the National Book Awards.

Atlantic Books is a founding member of The Independent Alliance, a global alliance of UK publishers and their international partners, formed in 2005 it is now the fourth largest publishing group in the UK, allowing Atlantic to reach the widest possible market for its authors.

Recent publishing successes include the bestsellers My Sister the Serial KillerCall Me By Your NameCrazy Rich Asians, Wild and Why We Get the Wrong Politicians.

Imprints

Allen & Unwin

Australia’s leading and largest independent publisher is the majority shareholder of Atlantic Books. In the UK, we publish quality non-fiction for a ready market, as well as a carefully selected list of literary and commercial fiction.


Corvus

Corvus was born in 2010 as a home for Atlantic Books’ genre fiction and to reach the digital reader. From bestselling series authors such as Phil Rickman, Robert Fabbri and Anne Holt, to emerging talent such as Holly Seddon, Elisabeth Gifford, Sanjida Kay and Lucy Dawson, Corvus is an exciting hub of women’s, historical, romance, crime and thriller writing, bringing popular authors and thrilling stories to voracious readers.


Grove Press

A leading independent literary publisher in the US since 1917, Grove Atlantic has a long and illustrious history; publishing many of the Beats, including William S. Burroughs, Jack Kerouac, and Allen Ginsberg, as well as a wide range of drama, poetry and general non-fiction.

Grove Press is an imprint of Grove Atlantic who publish a boutique selection of their finest fiction and non-fiction into the UK market via Atlantic Books, thus ensuring authors such as P.J. O’Rourke, Francisco Goldman, Patrick Hoffman and John Lawton reach UK readers.


A selection of some of the Atlantic titles in my library

NB Amazon and Hive links are affiliate links

The Narrow Land by Christine Dwyer Hickey

WINNER OF THE WALTER SCOTT HISTORICAL PRIZE FOR FICTION, 2020

WINNER OF THE DALKEY LITERARY AWARD FOR NOVEL OF THE YEAR, 2020

SHORTLISTED FOR THE IRISH BOOK AWARDS, 2019

She, volatile, passionate and often irrational, suffers bouts of obsessive sexual jealousy. He, withdrawn and unwell, depressed by his inability to work, becomes besotted by Richie’s frail and beautiful Aunt Katherine who has not long to live – an infatuation he shares with young Michael.

A novel of loneliness and regret, the legacy of World War II and the ever-changing concept of the American Dream.


The Viper by Christobel Kent

Sandro Cellini faces his demons…

Sandro Cellini hasn’t set foot in La Vipera, a derelict farmhouse just outside Florence that was once home to a free-living commune, for forty years – until the discovery of two bodies nearby leads him back there.

At the start of his career, Cellini investigated an accusation that minors were being corrupted at La Vipera, but no charges were ever brought. Now, tasked with tracking down former members of the community, he has a chance to finally discover what really went on all those years ago.

But in order to learn the true nature of the commune’s mission, he must face his own traumatic memories. As he sifts through the lies, those closest to him are placed in danger. Only Cellini can unravel the final mystery of La Vipera, and so protect those he loves.


The Cat and the City by Nick Bradley

A BBC Radio 2 Book Club PickOne of the Independent‘s best June debuts

In Tokyo – one of the world’s largest megacities – a stray cat is wending her way through the back alleys. And, with each detour, she brushes up against the seemingly disparate lives of the city-dwellers, connecting them in unexpected ways.

But the city is changing. As it does, it pushes her to the margins where she chances upon a series of apparent strangers – from a homeless man squatting in an abandoned hotel, to a shut-in hermit afraid to leave his house, to a convenience store worker searching for love. The cat orbits Tokyo’s denizens, drawing them ever closer.


The Museum of Broken Promises by Elizabeth Buchan

Welcome to the Museum of Broken Promises,
a place of wonder, sadness … and hope.

Inside lies a treasure trove of objects – a baby’s shoe, a wedding veil, a railway ticket – all revealing moments of loss and betrayal. It is a place where people come to speak to the ghosts of the past. The owner, Laure, is also one of those people.

As a young woman in the 1980s Laure fled to Prague, where her life changed forever. Now, years later, she must confront the origins of her heart-breaking exhibition: a love affair with a dissident musician, a secret life behind the Iron Curtain, and a broken promise that she will never forget.


The Butchers by Ruth Gilligan

A photograph is hung on a gallery wall for the very first time since it was taken two decades before. It shows a slaughter house in rural Ireland, a painting of the Virgin Mary on the wall, a meat hook suspended from the ceiling – and, from its sharp point, the lifeless body of a man hanging by his feet.

The story of who he is and how he got there casts back into Irish folklore, of widows cursing the land and of the men who slaughter its cattle by hand. But modern Ireland is distrustful of ancient traditions, and as the BSE crisis in England presents get-rich opportunities in Ireland, few care about The Butchers, the eight men who roam the country, slaughtering the cows of those who still have faith in the old ways. Few care, that is, except for Fionn, the husband of a dying woman who still believes; their son Davey, who has fallen in love with the youngest of the Butchers; Gra, the lonely wife of one of the eight; and her 12-year-old daughter, Una, a girl who will grow up to carry a knife like her father, and who will be the one finally to avenge the man in the photograph.


The Far Field by Madhuri Vijay

WINNER OF THE 2019 JCB PRIZE FOR LITERATURE
SHORTLISTED FOR THE 2019 DSC PRIZE FOR SOUTH ASIAN LITERATURE

Cosmo’s one of the best books by BAME writers to get excited about in 2019
Longlisted for the 2019 Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction

An elegant, epic debut novel that follows one young woman’s search for a lost figure from her childhood, a journey that takes her from Southern India to Kashmir and to the brink of a devastating political and personal reckoning.

In the wake of her mother’s death, Shalini, a privileged and restless young woman from Bangalore, sets out for a remote Himalayan village in the troubled northern region of Kashmir. Certain that the loss of her mother is somehow connected to the decade-old disappearance of Bashir Ahmed, a charming Kashmiri salesman who frequented her childhood home, she is determined to confront him. But upon her arrival, Shalini is brought face to face with Kashmir’s politics, as well as the tangled history of the local family that takes her in. And when life in the village turns volatile and old hatreds threaten to erupt into violence, Shalini finds herself forced to make a series of choices that could hold dangerous repercussions for the very people she has come to love.

With rare acumen and evocative prose, in The Far Field Madhuri Vijay masterfully examines Indian politics, class prejudice, and sexuality through the lens of an outsider, offering a profound meditation on grief, guilt and the limits of compassion.


A Ration Book Christmas by Jean Fullerton

In the darkest days of the Blitz, Christmas is more important than ever.

With Christmas approaching, the Brogan family of London’s East End are braving the horrors of the Blitz. With the men away fighting for King and Country and the ever-present dangers of the German Luftwaffe’s nightly reign of death and destruction, the family must do all they can to keep a stiff upper lip.

For Jo, the youngest of the Brogan sisters, the perils of war also offer a new-found freedom. Jo falls in love with Tommy, a man known for his dangerous reputation as much as his charm. But as the falling bombs devastate their neighbourhood and rationing begins to bite, will the Brogans manage to pull together a traditional family Christmas? And will Jo find the love and security she seeks in a time of such grave peril?


To Capture What we Cannot Keep by Beatrice Colin

In February 1887, Caitriona Wallace and Émile Nouguier meet in a hot air balloon, floating high above Paris – a moment of pure possibility. But back on firm ground, their vastly different social strata become clear. Cait is a widow who because of her precarious financial situation is forced to chaperone two wealthy Scottish charges. Émile is expected to take on the bourgeois stability of his family’s business and choose a suitable wife. As the Eiffel Tower rises, a marvel of steel and air and light, the subject of extreme controversy and a symbol of the future, Cait and Émile must decide what their love is worth.

Seamlessly weaving historical detail and vivid invention, Beatrice Colin evokes the revolutionary time in which Cait and Émile live – one of corsets and secret trysts, duels and Bohemian independence, strict tradition and Impressionist experimentation. To Capture What We Cannot Keep, stylish, provocative and shimmering, raises probing questions about a woman’s place in that world, the overarching reach of class distinctions and the sacrifices love requires of us all.


The Midnight Watch by David Dyer

As the Titanic and her passengers sank slowly into the Atlantic Ocean after striking an iceberg late in the evening of April 14, 1912, a nearby ship looked on. Second Officer Herbert Stone, in charge of the midnight watch on the SS Californian sitting idly a few miles north, saw the distress rockets that the Titanic fired. He alerted the captain, Stanley Lord, who was sleeping in the chartroom below, but Lord did not come to the bridge. Eight rockets were fired during the dark hours of the midnight watch, and eight rockets were ignored. The next morning, the Titanic was at the bottom of the sea and more than 1,500 people were dead. When they learned of the extent of the tragedy, Lord and Stone did everything they could to hide their role in the disaster, but pursued by newspapermen, lawyers, and political leaders in America and England, their terrible secret was eventually revealed. The Midnight Watch is a fictional telling of what may have occurred that night on the SS Californian, and the resulting desperation of Officer Stone and Captain Lord in the aftermath of their inaction.

Told not only from the perspective of the SS Californian crew, but also through the eyes of a family of third-class passengers who perished in the disaster, the narrative is drawn together by Steadman, a tenacious Boston journalist who does not rest until the truth is found. David Dyer’s The Midnight Watch is a powerful and dramatic debut novel–the result of many years of research in Liverpool, London, New York, and Boston, and informed by the author’s own experiences as a ship’s officer and a lawyer.


Return to Fourwinds by Elisabeth Gifford

Shortlisted Author For Historical Writers’ Association’s Debut Crown For Best First Historical Novel

What will it cost to hide your deepest secrets from those you love most?

What could have caused Sarah to vanish? As both families search for the answer, the past floods through the corridors of the old house. What secret has Ralph been keeping from his wife? What is it about Alice’s wartime encounter with Peter that has haunted her ever since?


Some forthcoming titles that caught my eye

If you’re as tempted as I am you can sign up to Atlantic’s newsletter here to make sure you don’t miss any exciting new titles. You can also follow Atlantic via Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

If you want to see the full range of titles then follow this link, but be warned, there are so many great books, I defy you not to buy at least one!

Happy Reading!!

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