My Kindle Deals of the Day

Instead of doing a monthly Kindle post I’m going to see how it goes spreading the deals over the month and also picking up on shorter term offers. Consequently the number of books on offer each day will vary and occasionally might include only one.

As usual the choices will reflect books that I’d be tempted by and not just any books that are on offer.

The price quoted is that given at time of posting, please always check before buying as some prices can change quickly.

This decision is also a result of Facebook having made my existing Jill’s Book Cafe Page into a separate entity from my personal page. This is a problem if I’m using a tablet (my normal medium) as I am forced to access it via the app. As this no longer links allows me to post directly from Amazon I have to copy and paste the details over, by going in and out of the app each time. The whole process is getting tedious, plus the Facebook algorithms mean that fewer people are actually seeing the posts anyway. This way, the post goes directly to Facebook, but also to Twitter so it becomes more visible. Time wise it might become unworkable but I’ll see how it goes.

Feedback always appreciated, especially as many of you will already be signed up to other offer sites and don’t want another ‘deal’ post clogging up your email each day.

Bargain Reads

(NB This post features Affiliate links from which I earn a small commission on qualifying purchases)

Emily Parker is set to have the worst Christmas ever!

Her flatmate’s moved out, she’s closed her heart to love and she’s been put in charge of the school original Christmas show – with zero musical ability.

Disgraced superstar, Ray Stone is in desperate need of a quick PR turnaround. Waking up from a drunken stupor to a class of ten-year-olds snapping pics and Emily looking at him was not what he had in mind.

Ray needs Emily’s help to delete the photos, and she needs his with the show. As they learn to work together they may just open their hearts to more than a second chance…


Clare and Lorraine have been friends since college and trust each other with their lives. So when Lorraine, a single mother, needs a much-needed night away without her children, she calls on Clare and her husband Sam to look after them. They’re godparents – what could go wrong?

While Clare and Sam believe the children to be asleep, the unimaginable happens and Clare finds baby Theo lifeless in his room. The police are called. Statements are taken. But the biggest nightmare for any parent is about to spiral out of control.

Because a lie has been told. An enormous and terrible one.

Out of Clare, Sam and Lorraine, one of them isn’t telling the truth . . .


The first time somebody tried to kill him was an accident. 

The second time was deliberate. 

Now Paul Mulchrone finds himself on the run with nobody to turn to except a nurse who has read one-too-many crime novels and a renegade copper with a penchant for violence. Together they must solve one of the most notorious crimes in Irish history . . . 

. . . or else they’ll be history. 

A Man With One of Those Faces is the first book in Caimh McDonnell’s Dublin Trilogy, which melds fast-paced action with a distinctly Irish acerbic wit. 


I was supposed to be having the time of my life . . .

Working as an intern for a New York fashion magazine in the summer of 1953, Esther Greenwood is on the brink of her future. Yet she is also on the edge of a darkness that makes her world increasingly unreal. Esther’s vision of the world shimmers and shifts: day-to-day living in the sultry city, her crazed men-friends, the hot dinner dances . . .


Many of the popular, often prophetic, phrases that we use on a day-to-day basis have their roots in traditional folklore. For example: ‘One swallow doesn’t make a summer’; ‘March comes in like a lion and goes out like a lamb’; ‘One for sorrow, two for joy’. Such common idioms are familiar to most people, but their history and origins are far from well known. However, in One for Sorrow readers will discover that there is a wealth of fascinating stories and history behind them. This charming book is filled with sayings, legends and proverbs derived from the oral history of the countryside and unveils how they came about, what they mean, and how they came to be such a big part of the language we use today. Written with a light touch and expert knowledge, it will entertain and inform in equal measure – perfect for anyone with an interest in the rich and varied heritage of the English language.


Brighton 1930: Maureen O’Connell is a carefree girl, but her family is on the brink of tragedy, war is looming and life will never be the same again.

Jack and Nelson have always been dear friends to Maureen. Despite their different backgrounds, they’ve seen each other through thick and thin.

As Maureen blossoms from a little girl into a young woman, the candle she’s always held for Jack burns bright. But just as she’s found love, war wrenches them apart. The man she cherishes with all her heart is leaving.

When the bombs start to fall, Maureen and her family find themselves living in the most dangerous of times. With Jack no longer by her side and Nelson at war, Maureen has never felt more alone. Can she look to a brighter future? And will she find the true happiness she’s dreamt of?


Discover Amy Tan’s moving and poignant tale of immigrant Chinese mothers and their American-born daughters.

In 1949 four Chinese women, recent immigrants to San Francisco, meet weekly to play mahjong and tell stories of what they left behind in China. United in loss and new hope for their daughters’ futures, they call themselves the Joy Luck Club. Their daughters, who have never heard these stories, think their mothers’ advice is irrelevant to their modern American lives – until their own inner crises reveal how much they’ve unknowingly inherited of their mothers’ pasts.


We think of Queen Elizabeth I’s reign (1558-1603) as a golden age. But what was it actually like to live in Elizabethan England? If you could travel to the past and walk the streets of London in the 1590s, where would you stay? What would you eat? What would you wear? Would you really have a sense of it being a glorious age? And if so, how would that glory sit alongside the vagrants, diseases, violence, sexism and famine of the time?

In this book Ian Mortimer reveals a country in which life expectancy is in the early thirties, people still starve to death and Catholics are persecuted for their faith. Yet it produces some of the finest writing in the English language, some of the most magnificent architecture, and sees Elizabeth’s subjects settle in America and circumnavigate the globe. Welcome to a country that is, in all its contradictions, the very crucible of the modern world.


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