Jill’s Thursday Kindle Steals

Instead of doing a monthly Kindle post I’m going to see how it goes spreading the deals over the month and also picking up on shorter term offers. Consequently the number of books on offer each day will vary and occasionally might include only one.

As usual the choices will reflect books that I’d be tempted by and not just any books that are on offer.

The price quoted is that given at time of posting, please always check before buying as some prices can change quickly.

This decision is also a result of Facebook having made my existing Jill’s Book Cafe Page into a separate entity from my personal page. This is a problem if I’m using a tablet (my normal medium) as I am forced to access it via the app. As this no longer links allows me to post directly from Amazon I have to copy and paste the details over, by going in and out of the app each time. The whole process is getting tedious, plus the Facebook algorithms mean that fewer people are actually seeing the posts anyway. This way, the post goes directly to Facebook, but also to Twitter so it becomes more visible. Time wise it might become unworkable but I’ll see how it goes.

Feedback always appreciated, especially as many of you will already be signed up to other offer sites and don’t want another ‘deal’ post clogging up your email each day.

Bargain Reads

(NB This post features Affiliate links from which I earn a small commission on qualifying purchases)

The Night She Disappeared by Lisa Jewell

‘Mum, there’s some people here from college, they asked me back to theirs. Just for an hour or so. Is that OK?’

Midsummer 2017: teenage mum Tallulah heads out on a date, leaving her baby son at home with her mother, Kim.

At 11 p.m. she sends her mum a text message. At 4.30 a.m. Kim awakens to discover that Tallulah has not come home.

Friends tell her that Tallulah was last seen heading to a pool party at a house in the woods nearby called Dark Place.

Tallulah never returns.

2018: walking in the woods behind the boarding school where her boyfriend has just started as a head teacher, Sophie sees a sign nailed to a fence.

A sign that says: DIG HERE . . .


When I Come Home Again: 'A page-turning literary gem' THE TIMES, BEST BOOKS OF 2020 by [Caroline Scott]

When I Come Home Again by Caroline Scott

One Great War soldier with no memory.
Three women who claim him as their own.

1918. 
A soldier is arrested in Durham Cathedral in the last week of the First World War, but he has no memory of who he is or how he came to be there.

He is given the name Adam and transferred to a rehabilitation institution in the Lake District where Doctor James Haworth is determined to uncover his identity. But, unwilling to relive the trauma of war, Adam has locked his memory away, seemingly for good.

Then a newspaper publishes a feature about Adam, and three women come forward, each claiming that he is someone she lost in the war. But without memory, how do you know who to believe?

Based on true events, When I Come Home Again is a beautiful and compelling story about love, loss and longing in the aftermath of war, perfect for fans of Maggie O’Farrell and Helen Dunmore.


The Secrets of Bridgewater Bay: A darkly gripping dual-time novel of family secrets to be hidden at all costs... by [Julie Brooks]

The Secrets of Bridgewater Bay by Julie Brooks

England, 1919: Rose and Ivy board a ship bound for Australia.

One is travelling there to marry a man she has never met.

One is destined never to arrive.

Australia, 2016: Amongst her late-grandmother’s possessions, Molly uncovers a photograph of two girls dressed in First World War nurses’ uniforms, labelled ‘Rose and Ivy 1917’, and a letter from her grandmother, asking her to find out what happened to her own mother, Rose, who disappeared in the 1960s.

Compelled to carry out her grandmother’s last wish, Molly embarks on a journey to England to unravel the mystery of the two girls whose photograph promised they’d be ‘together forever’…


The Betrayal: A touching historical novel from the Women’s Prize-winning author of A Spell of Winter by [Helen Dunmore]

The Betrayal by Helen Dunmore

A powerful and touching novel of ordinary people in the grip of a terrible and sinister regime, and a moving portrait of a love that will not be extinguished.

Leningrad, 1952.

Andrei, a young hospital doctor and Anna, a nursery school teacher, are forging a life together in the post-war, post-siege wreckage. But their happiness is precarious, like that of millions of Russians who must avoid the claws of Stalin’s merciless Ministry for State security. So when Andrei is asked to treat the seriously ill child of a senior secret police officer, he and Anna are fearful.

Trapped in an impossible, maybe unwinnable game, can they avoid the whispers and watchful eyes of those who will say or do anything to save themselves?


The Best is Yet to Come: The new delightfully uplifting and life-affirming novel about love, friendship and second chances in 2021 by [Katy Colins]

The Best is Yet to Come by Katy Collins

When you feel invisible, friendship can offer a ray of hope

Sometimes it’s the things we don’t say that we need others to hear the loudest . . .

Izzy has always taken everything in her stride but motherhood is proving more difficult than she thought. She keeps telling herself it’s just a phase but the dark clouds are starting to appear.

Neighbour and widower Arthur might be in the winter of his life but he’s not ready to be packed off to a care home. He’s determined to do things his way.

When Izzy hears about Arthur’s big move, she offers to help. But Arthur isn’t telling her the whole story. It takes courage to admit you need a friend and when you feel invisible, all you need is a ray of hope. After all, what if the best is yet to come?


£7.99 for 3 months – sign up by end of November

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